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New Year, New IRS Rules

December 30, 2016 / by Mary Sue Renfro

Mary-Sue-Renfro-for-web-square.jpgFor accounting services professionals, the New Year always brings new regulations. Here's an overview of some of the key ones up ahead.

Mandatory New I-9 Form
This one's coming fast. Employers must start using the new I-9 form, a.k.a. the Employment Eligibility Verification Form, by January 22. The form is designed to verify compliance with the 1986 Immigration Control and Reform Act, which requires employers to confirm each employee's identity. Among the changes to the form, last updated in 2013, are a supplemental page for the preparer/translator.

Access the new form here.

New Filing Deadlines for W-2 and 1099 Forms
Under terms of the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of December 2015, employers must now submit their copies of W-2 forms to the Social Security Administration by January 31. Previously, employers had until either the last day of February (for paper copies) or the last day of March (for digital copies). In addition, employers can now file for only one 30-day extension, and they must file the required form (8809) by January 31.

The new deadline also applies to 1099 forms covering payments to independent contractors and certain other forms of compensation for non-employees. The current deadline for employers to furnish copies of W-2 forms to their employees, January 31, is unchanged.

According to an agency bulletin, the earlier deadlines "will make it easier for the IRS to verify the legitimacy of tax returns and properly issue refunds to taxpayers eligible to receive them."

New Filing Deadlines for 1065 and 1120C Forms
The filing dates for these two forms have essentially flip-flopped, per the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015. Form 1065, pertaining to partnership income, has changed from April 15 to March 15. Form 1120C, pertaining to C corporations, has changed from March 15 to April 15. (Form 1120S, for S corporations, remains March 15.)

The idea is that putting the partnership filing deadline (including Schedule K-1 "pass-through" taxes) ahead of the C corporation deadline would make it less likely that corporations would be forced to seek extensions for their tax returns.

The American Institute of CPAs has posted this handy guide summarizing original and extended tax return due dates.

One Significant Postponement
A quick reminder: The new revenue recognition standard set by the Financial Accounting Standard Board, originally slated to go into effect on December 15, 2016, has been postponed for accounting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, for most public companies and a year later for nonpublic companies. Among the reasons for the delay cited by the Journal of Accountancy was "a lack of available IT solutions for the new standard."

We haven't covered every change in IRS regulations, of course. Some, like the Transportation Mainline Pipeline Construction Industry Optional 62(c) Expense Substantiation Rules for Payments to Employees under Accountable Plans, cited in the IRS's Revenue Procedure 2016-55 bulletin, are incredibly arcane.

Be sure to stay tuned for an update on other changes going into effect in 2017. And if you're looking for the latest on the new Fair Labor Standards Act overtime regulations, I've also blogged on that topic.

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This website is created by Supporting Strategies to provide general bookkeeping and accounting information only. Supporting Strategies does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and the information contained herein is not intended to do so. As such, the information provided should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, legal and accounting advisors, and you should consult with a tax, legal or accounting professional before engaging in any transaction.

Topics: Rochester, Orlando

Mary Sue Renfro

Written by Mary Sue Renfro

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